Home West African News Nigeria News A Recovered Coronavirus Patient Might Be Reinfected If Exposed – WHO

A Recovered Coronavirus Patient Might Be Reinfected If Exposed – WHO

Coronavirus NigeriaThe World Health Organisation (WHO) has come out to say that there is currently no evidence that those who have recovered from COVID-19 cannot be re-infected.

In a recent “Scientific Brief” released from its headquarters in Geneva and posted on its site, WHO shut down the idea of immunity for the deadly virus, saying nothing is certain at this point.

According to WHO, despite some governments saying those who are now immune to the disease would be allowed to travel and go back to work, the fact remains that anyone who battled the virus and recovered might be infected again once exposed.

The organization added that the development of immunity to a pathogen through natural infection is a multi-step process that normally takes place over one to two weeks.

It read, “Some governments have suggested that the detection of antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, could serve as the basis for an ‘immunity passport’.

“They have suggested that it could serve as an ‘immunity passport’ or ‘risk-free certificate’ that would enable individuals to travel or return to work, assuming they are protected against re-infection.

“There is currently no evidence that people who have recovered from COVID-19 and have antibodies are protected from a second infection.

“The development of immunity to a pathogen through natural infection is a multi-step process that typically takes place over one to two weeks.”

“Most of these studies show that people who have recovered from infection have antibodies to the virus.

“However, some of these people have very low levels of neutralising antibodies in their blood, suggesting that cellular immunity may also be critical for recovery.”

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“Many countries are now testing for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies at the population level or in specific groups, such as health workers, close contacts of known cases, or within households.

“WHO supports these studies, as they are critical for understanding the extent of, and risk factors associated with the infection.

“These studies will provide data on the percentage of people with detectable COVID-19 antibodies, but most are not designed to determine whether those people are immune to secondary infections.”

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