Author Topic: Denmark's Green Card Programme: Danish Points Based Immigration Scheme  (Read 25079 times)

MyInfoStride

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Introduction

The Danish Green Card scheme allows you to live and work in Denmark if you can score enough points based upon criteria such as age, language skills, work experience, and education. If you score at least 100 points, you can obtain a residence permit valid for up to three years. In addtion, you will be able to bring your immediate family along.
As well as scoring 100 points, you must have a valid health insurance policy and be able to provide proof that you can support yourself and your family while you look for work in Denmark.

The Danish Green Card Points Based System

Under the Danish Green Card scheme, points are score under five areas: Education, Language Skills, Work Experience, Adaptability, and Age. It is also possible to score a number of bonus points for various factors described below.

Education

To score points for Education, you must have the Danish equivalent of a bachelors degree. Your academic credentials must be assessed by CIRIUS, a body under the Danish Ministry of Science, Technology, and Innovation.

In addition to points scored for your degree, bonus points can be awarded under Education for obtaining a degree from a top school or by having an education which qualifies you for work in an occupation on the Positive List.

With the addition of bonus points, the maximum number of points that can be scored for Education is 105. It is possible for you to score enough points for a work and residence permit based soley upon points earned for Education.

Education level    Points
Bachelors degree   30
Bachelors degree + 1 year Masters Degree   50
Masters degree   60
PhD   80

Bonus points can also be earned under Education:
School Ranking    Bonus Points
Top 400   5
Top 200   10
Top 100   15

Education related to occupation on the Positive List
Bonus  Points
Yes   10

Language Skills

You can earn a maximum of 30 points for language skills which includes knowledge of Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English or German. Points can be earned for both one Scandinavian language (Danish, Swedish, or Norwegian) and either English or German, but not for both English and German or two or more Scandinavian languages.

You will be required to show that you have passed an exam equivalent to at least a Danish Language Test, Level 1. Alternatively, you can prove language proficiency through a statement by your previous employer stating that you used Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English or German while performing your job for at least one year, or by proving that you have completed at least one year's study in higher education which was taught in one of these languages. In the case of these last two requirements, you will have shown a language proficiency equal to a Study Test in Danish as a Second Language.

Language Proficiency Level   Points
Level 1   5
Level 2   10
Level 3   15
Study Test in Danish as a Second Language   20

Work Experience

You can score a maximum of 15 points under Work Experience. Your points are earned based upon the number of years you have worked as a researcher, or in a field of work that is currently in shortage in Denmark (i.e., a job listed on the Positive List). If this does not apply to you, you can still earn points for experience any other single occupation.

Work Experience   Points
3-5 years experience as a researcher or in a field on the Positive List   15
1-2 years experience as a researcher or in a field on the Positive List   10
3-5 years experience in other work   5

Adaptability

If you have studied or worked in the European Union/European Economic Area, you can claim a maximum of 15 points for adaptability. You can only claim points for either education experience or work experience -- not both.

EU/EEA Education Experience   Points

Completion of at least one year of study in higher education in the EU/EEA or Switzerland   5
Completion of at least three years of study in higher education in the EU/EEA or Switzerland   10

EU/EEA Work Experience   Points

At least one year of work and residence in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland   5
At least two years of work and residence in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland   10

Age

You can also earn a maximum of 15 points for your age:
Age   Points
35-40 years   10
34 years or younger   15

Family Members

If you are granted a residence permit under Denmark's Green Card Scheme, your spouse or partner is also eligible for a residence permit, as well as any children under the age of 18 who are living at home with you. Your spouse or partner is allowed to work full time for the entire period of the residence permit's validity.

Read more: Denmark's Green Card Programme: Danish Points Based Immigration Scheme

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MyInfoStride

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Denmark's Green Card Programme: Financial requirements
« Reply #1 on: Aug 07, 2010, 10:05 AM »
To obtain a residence permit under the greencard scheme, you must be able to support yourself during your first year in Denmark. You need to document that you possess financial resources equivalent to one year of Danish Start Help benefits (starthjælp).

There are differing rates of Start Help, depending on your age and number of dependants.

The monthly Start Help rates are (2010 level):
•   DKK 5,267 for persons under the age of 25 living alone
•   DKK 6,351 for persons over the age of 25 living alone
•   DKK 5,267 per person for spouses or cohabiting partners
•   DKK 1,317 per child for married or cohabiting parents
•   DKK 1,589 per child for single parents

Bank account statements and similar documents can be used as documentation of your financial resources.

Example
If you want to obtain a residence permit under the greencard scheme and want to bring your spouse/partner and child, you are required to document that you have sufficient funds amounting to DKK 5,267 per month required to provide for yourself, DKK 5,267 per month to provide for your spouse/partner and DKK 1,317 per month to provide for your child.

In all, you must be able to prove that you have financial resources amounting to DKK 142,212 – (5,267 + 5,267 + 1,317) x 12 – the equivalent of one year of Start Help benefits for the same size family.

Please note: If your child/children apply for an independent residence permit but your spouse/partner (the child's/children's other parent) does not apply for a residence permit, the monthly Start Help amount is DKK 1,589 per child.

MyWorld

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Thank for this info and time taken to gather it. This is really useful. This opportunity exist but many were not aware or didn't know how to go about it. I hope people will utilise this thread to ask more questions about the scheme.

freeware

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Thank for this info and time taken to gather it. This is really useful. This opportunity exist but many were not aware or didn't know how to go about it. I hope people will utilise this thread to ask more questions about the scheme.

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MyInfoStride

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That is just the truth! Thanks for your comments. More information on this subject will be posted later and also about other opportunities in fresh topics. Just follow our updates...

MyInfoStride

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Below you will find a list of general assessments for Pakistani and Indian qualifications.

This page contains guidelines for general assessments of qualifications from:
    * Pakistan
    * India

Please note: It is important to stress that these general assessments only act as guidance and that any individual assessment carried out by the Danish Agency for International Education (previously CIRIUS) may differ from what you see below.

PAKISTAN


INDIA

MyInfoStride

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Re: Denmark's Green Card Programme: Documentation Requirements
« Reply #6 on: Aug 23, 2010, 06:52 PM »
When submitting your application, you must attach all relevant documentation for education (diplomas, transcripts and other statements issued by educational institutions) as colour copies.

The original documents must be presented when submitting your application at the Danish diplomatic mission (embassy or consulate general), at the Immigration Service, or at a police station in Denmark, where an official will use them to certify that the colour copy is authentic.

When processing your application, the Immigration Service may request that you submit the original educational documents.

Please note: Documents not written in Danish, English, German, Norwegian or Swedish must be submitted together with a certified translation in Danish or English.

Please note: Educational documents from Pakistan must be stamped by the HEC (Higher Education Commission) in Pakistan.

MyInfoStride

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Re: Denmark's Green Card Programme: The Positive List
« Reply #7 on: Aug 29, 2010, 09:41 PM »
Persons who have been offered a job in a profession currently experiencing a shortage of qualified professionals have particularly easy access to the Danish labour market. These professions and fields are listed on the Positive List. The scheme also applies to persons who have applied for asylum in Denmark.

If you are a Nordic citizen, you are free to reside, study and work in Denmark. If you are an EU/EEA citizen or Swiss citizen seeking residence in Denmark based on the EU rules on freedom of movement, you may be subject to special regulations. More information about EU/EEA and Nordic citizens.

If you already hold a Danish residence permit based on family reunification or asylum, or hold a residence permit on humanitarian grounds, you do not need a work permit in order to work in Denmark.

It is your own responsibility to obtain a work permit if you are required to. If you work illegally in Denmark, you risk deportation, and you and your employer risk fine or imprisonment.

Conditions

Your job must be listed on the Positive List. Furthermore, you must have a written job contract or job offer which specifies salary and employment conditions. Salary and employment conditions must correspond to Danish standards.

The minimum educational level required for a position on the Positive List is a Professional Bachelor's , such as a nurse or pedagogue. In some cases, you must obtain a Danish authorisation. This is explicitly stated on the Positive List. For example, foreign-trained doctors must be authorised by the Danish National Board of Health.

Read more about authorisation for foreign-trained doctors on the website of the National Board of Health.

Read more about access to regulated professions on the website of the Danish Agency for International Education.

Duration

Your residence permit can only be granted or extended up to three months before your passport expires. This means that if your passport expires in 12 months, you can only be granted a permit for nine months, or your permit can only be extended by nine months.

You can be issued a residence permit valid one month prior to your first day of work, if you declare that you are able to support yourself and any accompanying family members for the entire month before you begin working. Otherwise, your residence permit will be valid 14 days before your first day of work.

Residence permit for jobseeking

If you get a residence and work permit based on temporary job contract, you will also get up to six months' extra residence to look for work after your contract expires. However, you cannot be granted more than four years' residence in total. In the jobseeking period you are not allowed to work, so if you find a new job, you must apply for a new residence and work permit based on your new job. You must apply no later than the first day of employment at your new job.

If you lose your job through no fault of your own, e.g. due to cutbacks, you can get an additional six months' residence to look for a new job. In this case, you must apply for a residence permit for jobseeking no later than two days after the termination of your job contract. You can apply by sending a letter to the  containing your full name, address, CPR number, Alien Identification number (Udl.nr.) and a copy of your valid passport, along with a letter of termination or other documentation which explains why you lost your job. In order to get the additional six months' residence, it is a condition that you are not receiving public assistance under the active social policy act.

If you find a new job

If you find a new job while you are working, or while you hold a residence permit for jobseeking, you must apply for a new residence and work permit. However, you may begin your new job before you have received your new permit, provided that you submit your application no later than the day you start your new job.

Extension

If your residence and work permit expires, and you have applied for an extension, and if you are still in the same job, on the same terms and conditions, as when you were granted your original permit, you may stay in Denmark and continue working while the Immigration Service processes your application.

Your permit can be extended even if your job is no longer on the Positive List, provided that you are still in the same job, on the same terms and conditions.

Family members

If you hold a residence and work permit under the Positive List, your spouse, registered partner or cohabiting partner, as well as any children under the age of 18 who are living at home with you, are also eligible for residence permits. Your family members must be able to support themselves and you must live together in Denmark at the same address. Your spouse, registered partner or cohabiting partner is allowed to work full-time for the entire period his or her permit is valid.

The Positive List

The Positive List consists of a number of professional fields currently experiencing a shortage of qualified professionals.
•   Academic work
•   Construction
•   IT and telecommunication
•   Management
•   Educational, social and religious work
•   Sales, purchases and marketing
•   Health, healthcare and personal care
•   Freight forwarding, postal services, storage and engine operation
•   Education and tuition

MyInfoStride

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Denmark's Green Card Programme: Processing Your Case
« Reply #8 on: Sep 05, 2010, 08:24 PM »
Processing your case

The Immigration Service has received far more applications under the greencard scheme in 2009 than expected. As a result, the Immigration Service is behind with the processing of cases and is working hard to reduce the number of pending cases. This means that the normal 30 day service goal for maximum processing time has been temporarily suspended.

To avoid further delay, make sure that your application contains all information and documentation needed by the Immigration Service to process your case. If your application lacks required information or documentation, the Immigration Service may choose to reject your application on these grounds. This means that your application will not be processed.

If it is necessary to have your educational level assessed by the Danish Agency for International Education, you will be notified by the Immigration Service.

MyInfoStride

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Denmark's Green Card Programme: Duration and extension
« Reply #9 on: Sep 14, 2010, 04:36 PM »
Duration and extension

You can be granted a first-time residence permit under the greencard scheme for up to 18 months. Before the end of this period, you can apply for an extension of up to two years and six months. Before the end of this period, you can apply for an extension of up to four years.

Your residence permit can be extended if you have worked for the past 12 months for a minimum of ten hours per week.

Your residence permit can be extended for one year if you have lost your job through no fault of your own (e.g. due to cutbacks) no more than three months before applying for an extension, and if prior to this, you worked for 12 months for a minimum of ten hours per week.

You can submit your application for an extension no sooner than 2 months before it expires.

When applying for an extension of your residence permit, it is crucial that you submit your application on time, i.e. before your current residence permit expires. Failure to do so will normally result in your application being rejected due to your residing illegally in Denmark. As such, an application which is submitted too late will not be processed by the Immigration Service. Instead, you will have to leave Denmark and apply for a new residence permit from your country of origin.

Your residence permit can only be granted or extended up to three months before your passport expires. This means that if your passport expires in 12 months, you can only be granted a permit for nine months, or your permit can only be extended by nine months. If you have your passport renewed after receiving your residence permit, you can apply for the full period by sending a letter to the Immigration Service together with a copy of your renewed passport.

Read more about extension.

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Denmark's Green Card Programme: Duration and extension
« Reply #9 on: Sep 14, 2010, 04:36 PM »